Inspiration to Innovation in 2017- NAA Webinar

unnamed

As afterschool professionals we encourage children to be creative and innovative in their problem-solving, try new things, explore new possibilities and think big. But how often- as adult professionals- do we practice this ourselves?

Join NAA President Gina Warner as she presents on:

  • The impact innovation has made in the field of afterschool.
  • Strategies for finding ideas and inspiration.
  • Future innovation of the association and how it can help your program.

REGISTER HERE

Oregon STEM Education Plan

The Oregon STEM Investment Council has put forward a plan to expand student opportunities in Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math (STEAM) Education. The plan was created over the last year and a half in a joint process facilitated by the STEM Investment Council and the Chief Education Office. Working together, they engaged educators, businesses, community-based members, and diverse stakeholders across the state to outline four key goals to support student’s STEAM learning. Within the plan, Out-of-School Time is identified as a necessary ingredient for successful STEAM learning.

The STEM Education Plan is intended to help students develop workforce skills, and to create opportunities for collaboration between education, community, and industry partners to support student learning and economic development. Lindsey Capps, the Chief Education Officer, said, “The plan articulates a broad, long-term vision intended to guide policy, practices and priority-setting across education, workforce, and economic development.”

The four key goals outlined in the plan are intended to guide state, regional and local actions that help students build STEAM related skills, connected to career opportunities. They are:

  1. Inspire and empower students to develop the knowledge, skills, and mindsets necessary to thrive in a rapidly changing, technologically rich, global society.
  2. Ensure equitable opportunities and access for every student to become part of an inclusive innovation economy.
  3. Continuously improve the effectiveness, support, and the number of STEAM educators in K-12 and postsecondary education.
  4. Create sustainable and supportive conditions to achieve STEAM outcomes aligned to Oregon’s economic, education, and community goals.

Jim Piro, the chair of the STEM Investment Council, an advisory body to the Chief Education Office, and a key developer of the plan described the plan as, “a detailed roadmap, with key achievable goals and outcomes, that will bridge the gap between the skills and capabilities our students have and the skills and capabilities our businesses need, which is critical in supporting both a strong economy and vibrant communities in our state.”  

This plan is an exciting opportunity for STEAM education in Oregon, and particularly for STEM opportunities in out-of-school time! To read the full text of the plan, click here.

Exploring STEM Municipal Conversations

What does STEM mean to your community?

Thanks to a grant from the National League of Cities Institute for Youth, Education and Families, OregonASK worked with regional STEM Hubs and community STEM partners to host discussions about the importance and impact of Science, image001Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) on our communities. OregonASK is excited to be continuing our partnership with NLC as we increase awareness and share resources to help these communities find strategies for building a mutually beneficial system to support local economic vitality and informal STEM learning

It was a pleasure to travel the state and hear more about all of the amazing programs and partnerships working to improve access to STEM learning! You can read our NLC Summary Report, see the map of Municipal Summits and find additional resources and highlights below. Mark Lewis, STEM & CTE Policy Advisor for the Chief Education Office, was able to attend the events to share about the state’s STEM Strategic Plan and how the vision of STEM going forward should be a community collaboration. You can view the Executive Summary of the STEM Strategic Plan and take a look at the Summary Strategy Chart to see how you might be able to support STEM Learning in your community.

Each community brought together a diverse group of community leaders and STEM partners to contribute to conversation, share questions, and identify strategies for building an aligned system of support that would engage all stakeholders in supporting STEM learning. We heard from US Congresspeople, State Senators & Representatives, Mayors, City Council, County Commissioners, Chamber of Commerce, Workforce Boards, Industry Partners, Higher Education, K-12 Administrators, Formal & Informal Educators, Community Based STEM Programs, Libraries, Education & Community Foundations, and Students.

  • Washington County Breakfast August 24th in Hillsboro
  • Umpqua Valley STEAM Luncheon September 15th in Roseburg
  • Klamath Basin Celebration & Discussion September 16th in Klamath Falls
  • Central Oregon Luncheon September 19th in Bend
  • Willamatte Valley Breakfast September 22nd in Salem
  • Eastern Oregon Luncheon October 5th in LaGrande
  • Southern Oregon Economic Success Luncheon – October 10th in Medford

Exploring STEM Washington County Breakfast in Hillsboro

We partnered with Washington County Kids to host the breakfast at Hillsboro Public Library on August 24th and had over 50 community partners in attendance, including mayors from four Washington County cities and US Congresswomen Bonamici. Representatives from Hillsboro Chamber of Commerce, Business Education Compact (BEC), Impact NW, and Hillsboro School District shared about current partnerships they have to provide more informal STEM learning opportunities for youth in Washington County. We also had the pleasure of hearing from several students who have taken advantage of opportunities through Adelante Mujeres and Centro Cultural. You may contact Katie Riley at katie@katieriley.org for more information about Washington County Kids. Event Agenda and Washington County Informational Sheet

Umpqua Valley STEAM Luncheon September 15th in Roseburg

We partnered with the Umpqua Valley STEAM Hub to host lunch at the Ford Family Foundation, gathering over 35 participants from around Douglas County. Participants included school administrators from the far corners of the county, as well as mayors, informal STEM partners and local foundation representatives who were able to hear more about local industry needs and current opportunities. Contact Grace Goodson for more information about ongoing regional STEM Hub efforts. You can also download the Power Point from the lunch by Clicking HERE.

Klamath Basin Celebration September 16th in Klamath Falls

Our Klamath region celebration, in partnership with Klamath Promise, focused on the connectivity of regional efforts in supporting youth in the area. Representatives from the local school districts, post-secondary institutions and numerous community partners contributed to the rich conversation around existing partners expanding access to more hands-on experiences for more youth in the region. Student panelists added a personal perspective about local programs offered and potential opportunities to expand there reach. Klamath Agenda

Central Oregon STEM Luncheon Agenda September 19th in Redmond

Our convening in Central Oregon drew a high concentration of informal partners, as well as several key elected officials. State Representative Whisnant posed a question about the role of community partners in implementation of the STEM Strategic Plan, creating a great opportunitiy to highlight much of the work happening in pockets around the region and state, as well as showcasing the importance of providing informal STEM as a comprehensive system of support for youth. Participant feedback showed that the highlight of local partnerships and upcoming opportunities was one of the major benefits for those who attended. Several also shared their appreciation for the Strategic Plan overview and discussion time. From our own perspecitve, this region also did a great job including a wide-breadth of stakeholders, from industry to K-12 to workforce to community partners. You may contact Whitney Swander for more information about local opportunities. Event Agenda and Power Point

Willamette Valley Breakfast Agenda September 22nd in Salem

The event held in Salem showcased local partnerships, particularly the industry, district and city collaborative approach to building a state of the art Career and Technical Education Center (CTEC). The million dollar facility is currently utilized primarily by Salem-Keizer School District and is looking forward to expanding its reach while also promoting development of similar buildings/partnerships in other areas of the state. Participants were also excited to hear about the STEM Strategic Plan and how implementation would become part of the work they are already engaged in. Willamette Valley Agenda

Eastern Oregon Lunch Agenda October 5th in LaGrande

In partnership with the Greater Oregon STEM Hub (GO STEM), our Eastern Oregon convening brought together over 45 regional representatives from 5 different counties, talking about how local efforts can be supported and spread through the work of the STEM Hub. Participants were given time to discuss at tables, reflecting on their own needs and roles in further implementation of regional STEM efforts to support community wide engagment.

Southern Oregon STEM & CTE Lunch October 10th in Medford

On October 10th, Southern Oregon Success and Southern Oregon STEM Hub brought together 70 regional STEM & CTE partners, local elected officials and industry representatives to talk about coordinated efforts. Attendees were given a breadth of information about region-wide STEM, CTE, workforce and educational efforts, including local highlights of programs. Most participants showed up with some knowledge of the work happening locally, but all left with the specific ask of being more engaged in supporting these coordinated efforts.

Summer Learning Block Party

Summer-Block-Party

June 26th, 2017

We gathered at Gilbert House Children’s Museum from 10am-2pm to celebrate summer learning and see what amazing opportunities are available in the community. The museum had free admission for over 1200 youth and parents, with over 20 local partners hosting activities and information outside for families.

Activities happened inside and out throughout the day and here are a few pictures from the day.

  • Summer Matters Celebration & Parade 12 pm
  • Story Time in our Outdoor Book Corner @ 10 am, 11 am & 1 pm
  • Free Ice Cream from Umpqua Bank

Partners present included:

  • Salem Keizer Education Foundation
  • MWVCAA-Head Start
  • Marion & Polk Early Learning Hub
  • Family YMCA of Marion and Polk Counties
  • Salem Public Library
  • Community Health Improvement Plan – Marion County
  • Salem Police Department
  • Salem Art Association
  • Salem Multicultural Institute
  • Micronesian Islander Community
  • Willamette Heritage Center (Mission Mill)
  • Kroc Center & Salvation Army
  • Marion County 4-H
  • Boys and Girls Club
  • SMART
  • Cherriots
  • My Living Canvas
  • Oregon Virtual Academy
  • Marion County Fair
  • Young at Art

Summer Block Party June 27, 2016

Hundreds of children and adults joined us at the Gilbert House Children’s Museum in Salem to celebrate summer learning! The party ran from 10am-5pm, with free admission to the Museum all day long and a dozen tables of activities and resources for families to interact with! Gilbert House, National Summer Learning Association, OregonASK and local partners worked to highlight the importance of summer learning. The day’s events included:

10:00 AM Kick Off with NSLA Board Chair & Founder Matthew Boulay, Oregon State Librarian Mary Kay Dahlgreen, Oregon State Senator Mark Hass and US Senator Wyden Representative
10:30 AM BirdSlueth Obstacle Course with OregonASK
11:00 AM Storytime in the Sun with Mary Kay Dahlgreen
11:30 AM Toddler Stories & Songs with Newberg Librarian Mary Lynn Thomas
12:00 PM Door Prize Drawing
Dramatic Reading with Sierra Langford
1:00 PM Afternoon Reading with Chris Ross, Bryce Kozla and Katie Anderson
3:00 PM Door Prize Drawing & Zumba Dance Party with YMCA
4:00 PM Interactive Live Music with Jon Chinburg of FlexTones

IMG_1728Not to mention, a full museum of fun, partner tables with exciting activities all day long, and food carts galore! Thank you for all who came out and participated!

  • Salem-Keizer Education Foundation Build It blocks, Bicycle Smoothies, Free Books and Trivia Challenge Wheel
  • Young at Art with a hands-on art projects
  • Marion & Polk County Early Learning Hub
  • Marion County OSU Extension let kids make Flubber to take home
  • Willamette Humane Society
  • Oregon Department of Education Early Learning Division with Vroom
  • Family YMCA of Marion & Polk Counties
  • Salem Public Library signed kids up for the Summer Reading Challenge
  • Willamette Heritage CenterIMG_1727
  • Willamette Valley Wellness providing massages for the weary
  • Salem Bike Boulevard Advocates
  • Face Painting thanks to My Living Canvas
  • Courthouse Fitness
  • Dolce Mama’s Ice Cream Cart

Thanks to our event sponsors New York Life, Fresh n’ Local, and Kettle Foods for their generous contributions! And to Umpqua Bank for distributing free ice cream and summer fun workbooks!

IMG_1738

NYL_Logo_With_Taglinecropped-FNL_HLOGO
KettleFoods

Download the Summer Block Party Flyer

Local & National STEM Experts

Lynn Dierking

Professor of Free-Choice STEM Learning, College of Science, and Associate Dean for Research, College of Education, Oregon State University. She is internationally recognized for her research on lifelong learning, particularly free-choice, out-of-school time learning (in after-school, home-, and community-based contexts), with diverse youth and families. Recently completed projects include two NSF-funded studies: Cascading Influences, long-term impacts of girls-only informal STEM programs; and, Pathways to Brighter Futures, with incarcerated Hispanic youth. Current research includes NSF-funded projects at Denver Museum of Nature & Science, focused on youth and family STEM literacy, and two projects at Oregon Museum of Science & Industry: REVEAL, investigating family mathematical discourse at math-related exhibits and Designing Our World (DOW), studying girls’ identities in relationship to engineering. She is also co-investigator on the Noyce-funded SYNERGIES project, studying youths’ STEM, creativity and invention interest trajectories in an under-resourced community in Portland and a connected effort, the Lemelson-funded Advancing STEM, Creativity, and Invention Learning through SYNERGIES project. Lynn publishes extensively and is on three editorial boards. Her awards include the 2010 American Association of Museums’ John Cotton Dana Award for Leadership and being an invited speaker in NSF’s 2013 Distinguished Lecture Series.

John Falk

Dr. John H. Falk, Sea Grant Professor of Free-Choice Learning at Oregon State University and Director, OSU Center for Research on Lifelong STEM Learning, is internationally acknowledged as a leading expert on free-choice learning; the learning that occurs while visiting museums or parks, watching educational television or surfing the Internet for information. Dr. Falk has authored over one hundred fifty scholarly articles and chapters in the areas of learning, biology and education, more than a dozen books, and helped to create several nationally important out-of-school educational curricula. He serves on numerous national and international boards and commissions and has been Associate Editor of several internationally prominent journals. Before joining the faculty at Oregon State University, he founded and directed the Institute for Learning Innovation where he oversaw more than 200 research and evaluation projects involving a wide range of free-choice learning institutions. He also worked as an early child science educator at the University of Maryland and spent fourteen years at the Smithsonian Institution where he held a number of senior positions including Director, Smithsonian Office of Educational Research. In 2006 Falk was recognized by the American Association of Museums as one of the 100 most influential museum professionals of the past 100 years. In 2010 he was further recognized by the American Association of Museum’s Education Committee with its highest award, the John Cotton Dana Award for Leadership. In 2013 the Council of Science Society President’s gave Falk their Educational Research Award for his outstanding achievement in research that improved children’s learning and understanding. Falk earned a joint doctorate in Ecology and Science Education from the University of California, Berkeley.

Heidi Ham

Heidi Ham recently joined NAA as Vice President of Programs and Strategy. She works to advance current work and to create and support new opportunities specifically focused on quality improvement, advancing professionalism, and strengthening state and local alliances. In 1996, Heidi started as a site director with Champions before- and after-school programs in Portland, Oregon, and later became a multisite manager of twelve . Since then, Heidi has served in various roles with the Knowledge Universe (KU) Education Department, working with sites across the nation and facilitating training for a variety of program types including science and academic intervention, coaching for continuous improvement, and developing tools and resources. Heidi is a Council on Accreditation endorser, a Weikart Center for Youth Program Quality Work Methods and Program Management Series trainer, and a National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) conference proposal reviewer. Heidi holds a bachelor of arts in social science and education from Central Washington University. She currently lives in the D.C. metro area with her husband, who also works in the afterschool field.

Anita Krishnamurthi

Anita Krishnamurthi joined the Afterschool Alliance in June 2010 as Director of STEM Policy after serving as the John Bahcall Public Policy Fellow for the American Astronomical Society. As Vice President of STEM Policy, Anita is responsible for creating and advancing federal, state and local opportunities and policies to expand resources and activities that provide students with access to a rich STEM curriculum in their afterschool programs. Anita brings nearly a decade of experience in science education and outreach to a wide variety of audiences to this role. Prior to her fellowship, she worked at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for six years, firstly as an Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Program Planning Specialist at NASA-HQ, and then as Lead for EPO in the Astrophysics Science Division at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Before joining NASA, Anita was a Program Officer at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C. in the Office on Public Understanding of Science. Anita’s formal training is as an astrophysicist, receiving her PhD from The Ohio State University. She conducted her postdoctoral work at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Gil Noam

Gil Noam, Ed. D., is the founder and director of the program in Education, Afterschool & Resiliency (PEAR) at Harvard University. An Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School and McLean Hospital focusing on prevention and resilience, Dr. Noam trained as a clinical and developmental psychologist and psychoanalyst in both Europe and the United States. Dr. Noam has a strong interest in translating research and innovation to support resilience in youth in educational settings. He served as the Drector of the Risk and Prevention program at Harvard, and is the founder of the RALLY Prevention Program, an intervention that combines early detection of health, mental health and learning problems in middle school youth, and pioneers a new professional role – “prevention practitioner”. Dr, Noam has published over 200 papers, articles, and books on topics related to child and adolescent development, and risk and resiliency. He is the editor-in-chief of the award-winning journal New Directions in Youth Development: Theory, Practice and Research and onsulsts nationally and internationally to youth development, education and child mental health organizations, foundations and agencies.

Nate Otto

Nate Otto is the present Interim Director of the Badge Alliance, representing Concentric Sky, where he is Director of Open Badges. Nate focuses on the Open Badges specification and creating a cooperative environment where many businesses and organizations can build interoperable software to issue and deeply understand credentials across learning contexts.

Diane Smith

A life-long teacher, Diane Smith began her career as a play-ground monitor in fourth grade. Her 30-plus years of public school experience spans instruction at the elementary, middle, high school and college levels. An expert in the fields of curriculum and instruction, she shared her talents as a teacher, alternative school principal and Director of Curriculum for a large Oregon school district. She is the author of several reflective and research documents on proficiency, as well as It’s About Time, A Framework for Proficiency-based Teaching & Learning. Diane delivers college courses on such topics as administrator leadership, grading for learning in a standards-based classroom and student-centered practices. She is a passionate advocate for proficiency/competency-based education, presenting at national conferences such as Achieve, iNACOL, National Association of Secondary School Principals and ASCD.

Maryann Stimmer

Maryann Stimmer supports STEM education nationally through professional development and project and curriculum design. She is the architect of the Frontiers in Urban Science Education model used in sixteen states and the senior technical adviser on two National Science Foundation projects. Ms. Stimmer served as the chairperson of the Math Special Interest Group (SIG) at the Association for Science and Technology Centers (ASTC) and founded the STEM SIG at the National Afterschool Association. She also served on the US Department of Education’s STEM Technical Working Group and the National Science Teacher Association’s Committees on Informal Science Education and Science Education for Students with Disabilities. Ms. Stimmer is the recipient of the 2008 National Science Teachers Association’s Distinguished Informal Educator Award, the 2009 After School Experience Excellence Award and the New York City Reliance Award for Education. She has been named one of the National Afterschool Association’s 25 Most Influential People in STEM.”

Critical Conversation Workshops

Thursday May 12th Sessions 10:30am – 12pm

Connecting Education to Careers
Industry, education, and community partners will discuss the opportunities and challenges of cross-sector partnerships that connect and prepare youth for the workforce. Panelists will share examples of promising CTE-STEM programs and initiatives that are closing the opportunity gap by preparing youth for careers.
Facilitated by Kyle Ritchy-Noll
Ignitors: Susan Nielsen of Portland Workforce Alliance, Andrew McGough Director of Worksystems Inc. and Susan Shugerman from Oregon Health Sciences University, Kimberly Howard Education Initiatives for PGE.

Equity: Engaging Girls & Underrepresented Students
Learn best-practices, hear success stories, and explore tools to better engage girls and underrepresented minorities in STEM. This session features national organizations and local experts, including the National Girls Collaborative Project and state collaboratives, Oregon State University, Oregon science centers and STEM program providers..
Facilitated by Karen Peterson, National Girls Collaborative CEO and Bethany Thramer
Ignitors: Lynn Dierking, Sea Grant Professor in Free-Choice STEM Learning at Oregon State University, Stephanie Peters from Airway Science for Kids, Mike McKeown New Jersey’s Afterschool Communities Director of 21st CCLC and STEM Initiatives, Nick Spicher from Science Factory & Carolyn Nesbitt from High Desert Museum.

A Collective Responsibility: Building STEM Identity
How do we help all youth build a strong, positive STEM Identity? The discussion will center on creating and incorporating a methodology that can be used in a variety of settings across the country. As we talk about informal STEM learning, we must help community partners, stakeholders and key decision makers understand the importance we all have in supporting youth as they build their own STEM identity.
Facilitated by Maryann Stimmer, Director of STEMeducators Inc
Ignitors: Mark Lewis, Oregon Director of STEM & CTE, Gil Noam, PEAR Institute Harvard and Elizabeth Nye, Executive Director of Girls Inc of the Pacific Northwest

Tools to Impact STEM learning
The systems we build affect and impact youth STEM learning. The structure and tools we use can help inspire and educate youth in STEM. Conversation igniters will share their experiences utilizing Invention, Inquiry and Growth Mindset when designing experiences with youth.
Facilitated by Susan Hamann of OregonASK & Rachel Brunette of Lemelson Foundation
Featuring Yong Zhao, Director of Institute for Global and Online Education, Tong Zhang Director of Oregon MESA, and Matt Karlsen Opal Charter School.

STEM Programs in Out of School Settings
Research and evaluation findings are not yet robust enough to determine which programs work best for whom and under what circumstances. The limitations of the existing research are due to the many types of out-of-school STEM programs, and the difficulties of measuring the outcomes of such programs. The findings are strong enough, however, to identify three criteria of programs that produce positive outcomes for learners: they are engaging, responsive, and make connections. Discuss the National Research Council report Identifying and Supporting Productive STEM programs in Out-of-School Settings.
Featuring John Falk, College of Education, Oregon State University and Martin Storksdieck, Institute for Learning Innovation, Corvallis

Municipal Leadership to Build STEM Skills: Critical Roles to Build a Sustainable Workforce
Municipal leaders are critical partners in building statewide support and fostering an ecosystem that sustainability supports STEM. Panelists will share about their experiences, and the need for economic development and the role of municipal leaders to garner broader support for STEM.
Facilitated by Bela Shah Spooner of the National League of Cities
Ignitors: Jared Wiener of Portland Development Commission, CJ Robbins from City of Portland, Paul Morin of Alabama Afterschool Network and Lisa Pelligrino from the Portland Children’s Investment Levy

Friday May 13th Sessions 10:15-11:45 am

Student Centered Learning Using Digital Badges
Experts from the forefront of Digital Badging will engage in a discussion about the ‘bigger picture’ as several Mozilla Foundation pilots share about the work they have been doing to build Student Centered Learning and Open Badge Systems. There are exciting examples of connecting informal STEM leaning to school day requirements.
Facilitated by: Iris Bond-Gill from the Mozilla Foundation
Ignitors: Diane Smith of Business Education Compact’s Teaching & Learning Initiative, Nate Otto from National Badge Alliance & Concentric Sky, Randy Macdonald from Innovate Oregon, and Marcia Dvorak from Kansas Out of School Network

Scouting for Rural Solutions
Explore the connections between STEM ecosystems, economic development and the challenges of building STEM support systems in rural communities.
Featuring  Jeff Cole, Director of Nebraska Beyond the Bells and Thomas Azzarella, Director of Alaska Afterschool Network and Gwen Soderberg-Chase of Umpqua Valley STEAM Hub

Building Creativity in the Summer Space
Summer has the power to engage students, to support academic learning, and to close the achievement gap. Learn from summer learning experts, hear success stories from around the country, and engage in a critical discussion about creating exemplary summer learning experiences.
Facilitated by Ellie Mitchell, Director of Maryland Out of School Time Network & Krina Lee Director of Salem-Keizer Education Foundation.
Ignitors: Matthew Boulay, Founder of National Summer Learning Association and Brian Berry from OMSI

The Role of Mentoring 
This session will be about developing clear guidelines about the elements of quality STEM mentoring in afterschool, especially mentoring pathways that can allow for sustained engagement. Participants will discuss current models, best practices, challenges and opportunities. From this convening criteria for best practices will contribute to the ongoing development of STEM Mentoring Resources for afterschool.
Facilitated by: Rachel Kessler & Victoria Wegener

STEM and The Power of Public Policy
We will explore and discuss policies set in place throughout the country and how they have effectively stimulated the expansion of STEM learning. Particular attention will be paid to how we might emphasize and include expanded learning in other educational or workforce initiatives.
Featuring Bela Shah Spooner from National League of Cities and Anita Krishnamurthi from the Afterschool Alliance

Professional Development: Connecting Beyond the Bell
National and state STEM professional development experts will explore the reseach to practice elements of best practice for enhancing out-of-school time professional development and technical assistance.
Facilitated by Susan Hamann & Maryann Stimmer
Ignitors: Sue Allen from Maine Mathematics & Science Alliance, Heidi Ham from National Afterschool Association, Holly Carr from Click to Science and Tracy Truzansky from Vermont Statewide STEM Network

STEM Institute Speakers

Ron Ottinger

As the Executive Director of the STEM Next, Ron Ottinger oversees all program areas and operations of the Noyce Foundation. For the past eight years, he has led the foundation’s strategies and initiatives in informal and out-of-school-time science, focusing on field-building efforts that are marrying afterschool and science. Ron also spearheads the foundation’s human capital management and math initiatives. Prior to joining Noyce, Ron served for fourteen years as National Associate Director of the non-profit AVID Center, which disseminates AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination), the nationally acclaimed college preparation program for low-income students. He was elected to three terms on the San Diego City Schools’ Board of Education from 1992-2004, during a period of major reform of the school system, and was the longest running board president.

Building STEM System Panel

Kari Pardoe, Facilitator

Kari Pardoe is an associate program officer at the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation.
Pardoe most recently directed The LEAGUE Michigan, a K-12 service-learning and
philanthropy program of the Michigan Nonprofit Association (MNA) and joined the
MNA in 2006 after serving as manager of community relations at the Pistons Palace
Foundation for Palace Sports and Entertainment in Auburn Hills. Pardoe is a graduate
of Central Michigan University in Mount Pleasant, where she received a bachelor’s
degree in Applied Arts in Commercial and Community Recreation. Pardoe also holds a
master’s in Public Administration in Nonprofit Administration from Grand Valley State
University in Allendale, Michigan.

Dr Amelia Courts

Since 2013 Dr. Courts has served as the President/CEO of The Education Alliance which cultivates business and community support for public education.  Under her leadership, the Alliance launched a statewide education summit, provided technical assistance to the Governor’s STEM Council and directed programs that serve over 21,000 West Virginia students. In addition, she worked to help support an expansion of the AmeriCorps program which nearly doubled the number of AmeriCorps members impacting students across the state.

Prior to coming to the Alliance, she served as Assistant State Superintendent at the West Virginia Department of Education. She taught English as a Second Language (ESL) for six years in Japan and China as well as at Marshall University. In 2002, she completed her doctoral degree at West Virginia University.

Martha McCabe

Martha McCabe serves as the Director for the Kansas City STEM Alliance developing relationships with preK -12 schools, post-secondary institutions, STEM organizations and industry working on strategic education initiatives, community partnerships and workforce needs.  Martha serves as the project lead for Kansas City’s STEM Learning Ecosystem, ecosySTEM KC, chairs the regional Girls in STEM Committee, is the co-state leader for the MO/KS Million Women Mentor initiative and coordinates outreach and advocacy efforts serving as a liaison to the national Project Lead the Way and FIRST organizations. As a clinical exercise physiologist, Martha worked at healthcare facilities prior to focusing on healthcare advocacy and workforce initiatives. With an interest in rural healthcare issues, Martha opened a federally and state funded Area Health Education Center earning a National AHEC Outstanding Health Professions Education Program Award, WI Business Friend of Education and WI DPI Outstanding Rural Schools Initiative Award. She received both her graduate and undergraduate degrees from the University of Kansas and resides in Lawrence, Kansas.

Ann Marie McSwiggan

Anne Marie McSwiggan is the General Manager for Intel Corporate Services Technology Development. Scottish born, McSwiggan joined Intel 14 years ago as Chemical Engineer in Ireland in 2002. She managed technology and was the Site Manager for Ireland before moving to Oregon in 2013. In her current role with Intel, she manages all Technology Development sites for Corporate Services, including the Oregon site in Hillsboro. Hillsboro is Intel’s largest and most advanced site in the world and is the global center of semiconductor research and manufacturing.

McSwiggan lives in Portland, OR with her husband and daughter. McSwiggan’s husband and their two children, (their son still lives overseas), are in the music industry. When not on official Intel business, McSwiggan splits time between training and competing on her horse and following her musical family around the country.

Jim Piro

Jim Piro has more than 40 years’ experience in the utility business. Before becoming CEO in 2009, he served nine years as executive vice president of Finance, chief financial officer and treasurer. Piro serves on several boards and is chair of Greater Portland Inc. and the Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Investment Council. He is a member of the Oregon Global Warming Commission and is active in the business and utility industries, both locally and nationally, serving on the boards of the Oregon Business Council and the Edison Electric Institute. He is also a member of the Electrification Coalition, a national group of business leaders advocating for policies that support electric vehicles. He serves also on the Oregon State University Foundation and the PGE Foundation. Piro earned a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering with an emphasis in structural engineering from Oregon State University.

Graham Pugh

Graham Pugh became Deputy Director of The Lemelson Foundation in 2015. In that capacity he works to help advance programs and initiatives in support of our strategy, as well as lead efforts that span across the Foundation’s portfolio. Graham draws on three decades of diverse experience in the public policy, international development, engineering, and technology sectors.

Prior to joining the Foundation, Graham most recently served as director of the Office of Climate Change Policy and Technology at the U.S. Department of Energy. In that position, he oversaw engagement with global energy ministries and managed agreements focused on renewable energy, energy efficiency and access, and human capacity. Previously, Graham served at the White House as deputy associate director for Technology and International Affairs at the Council on Environmental Quality. Graham also spent years facilitating development of new technologies for Intel and other corporations. Graham holds a B.A. in physics and a master of engineering from Cornell University. He also served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Kenya.

What, Why and How We Talk STEM

John Falk

Dr. John H. Falk, Sea Grant Professor of Free-Choice Learning at Oregon State University and Director, OSU Center for Research on Lifelong STEM Learning, is internationally acknowledged as a leading expert on free-choice learning; the learning that occurs while visiting museums or parks, watching educational television or surfing the Internet for information. Dr. Falk has authored over one hundred fifty scholarly articles and chapters in the areas of learning, biology and education, more than a dozen books, and helped to create several nationally important out-of-school educational curricula. He serves on numerous national and international boards and commissions and has been Associate Editor of several internationally prominent journals. Before joining the faculty at Oregon State University, he founded and directed the Institute for Learning Innovation where he oversaw more than 200 research and evaluation projects involving a wide range of free-choice learning institutions. He also worked as an early child science educator at the University of Maryland and spent fourteen years at the Smithsonian Institution where he held a number of senior positions including Director, Smithsonian Office of Educational Research. In 2006 Falk was recognized by the American Association of Museums as one of the 100 most influential museum professionals of the past 100 years. In 2010 he was further recognized by the American Association of Museum’s Education Committee with its highest award, the John Cotton Dana Award for Leadership. In 2013 the Council of Science Society President’s gave Falk their Educational Research Award for his outstanding achievement in research that improved children’s learning and understanding. Falk earned a joint doctorate in Ecology and Science Education from the University of California, Berkeley.

Anita Krishnamurthi

Anita Krishnamurthi joined the Afterschool Alliance in June 2010 as Director of STEM Policy after serving as the John Bahcall Public Policy Fellow for the American Astronomical Society. As Vice President of STEM Policy, Anita is responsible for creating and advancing federal, state and local opportunities and policies to expand resources and activities that provide students with access to a rich STEM curriculum in their afterschool programs. Anita brings nearly a decade of experience in science education and outreach to a wide variety of audiences to this role. Prior to her fellowship, she worked at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for six years, firstly as an Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Program Planning Specialist at NASA-HQ, and then as Lead for EPO in the Astrophysics Science Division at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Before joining NASA, Anita was a Program Officer at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C. in the Office on Public Understanding of Science. Anita’s formal training is as an astrophysicist, receiving her PhD from The Ohio State University. She conducted her postdoctoral work at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Heidi Sipe

Heidi Sipe serves as the Superintendent of the Umatilla School District. An Eastern Washington native, she began her work in Oregon in 2000 and has developed a deep passion for rural education, especially for linguistically diverse students and students of poverty. She is committed to ensuring that all students have opportunities to achieve their future dreams by establishing a strong foundation of skills through effective instruction delivered by dedicated and skilled staff. She believes in the power of extended learning time and has been a champion for after-school and summer school opportunities for students. Sipe took a leave of absence from Umatilla to serve as the Assistant Superintendent for the Oregon Department of Education in fall of 2012 and oversaw the Office of Educational Improvement and Innovation before returning to her district in spring of 2013. Sipe currently chairs the Teacher Standards and Practices Commission and has been a member of the commission since 2012. She is the current President of the Oregon Association of School Executives and held various leadership roles with the Confederation of Oregon School Administrators. She was selected as Oregon Superintendent of the Year in 2016. Heidi received her Bachelors of Arts in Reading from Eastern Washington University and her administrative credentials and Ed.S in Educational Leadership from Lewis and Clark College in Portland, Oregon.

Future of Education Panel

Iris Bond-Gill

Iris Bond Gill works with the Mozilla Foundation on projects related to web literacy, digital badges, and promoting any time, any place, and any pace learning. Prior to working with Mozilla, she was Assistant Superintendent of K12 at the DC state education agency. Ms. Gill started her career as a seventh grade teacher in New Orleans. She holds a masters degree in public policy & management from Carnegie Mellon University and a bachelors degree from Arizona State University.

Kiki Prottsman

Kiki is Education Program Manager at Code.org and a former computer science instructor at the University of Oregon. As a champion for responsible computing and equity in both CS employment and education, Kiki works with many organizations to improve the experience of girls and women in STEM. Her landmark work with the hands-on Traveling Circuits computer science curriculum helped Thinkersmith receive the 2013 Google RISE Award for excellence in Science and Engineering. She currently sits on the Advisory Board for Wonder Workshop Robotics, and is a member of the Leadership team for the Oregon Girls Collaborative Project.

Wayne Skipper

Wayne Skipper is Founder and CEO of Concentric Sky and also chairs the board of Innovate Oregon. His background spans both hardware and software technologies, including award-winning works of technology art. Recently Wayne has helped pioneered the area of digital credentials and in 2014 launched the Oregon Badge Alliance.

Speakers & Ignitors

Lindsey Capps

Lindsey Capps is Chief Education Officer and Education Policy Advisor to Governor Kate Brown. Lindsey has worked with education and community leaders across Oregon, and has a track record of being a bridge builder. Lindsey has effectively developed strategic partnerships and enacted innovative policy solutions to improve student learning. Prior to serving Governor Brown, Lindsey was deputy to Chief Education Officer Nancy Golden. Prior to his recent leadership roles, Lindsey was instrumental in the creation of the Center for Great Public Schools, a hub for education policy, practice and research within the Oregon Education Association. He served as Chair of the statewide Coalition for Quality Teaching and Learning, and was an executive committee member of the Oregon Leadership Network, an initiative of Education Northwest to improve educational equity in Oregon’s public schools. Lindsey served in the Clinton Administration as a special assistant at the U.S. Department of Commerce, and was a policy advisor to the House Minority Leader and a ranking member of the Ways and Means and Joint Economic Committees in Congress. A native Oregonian, Lindsey is a product of Oregon public schools. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of California at Santa Barbara, and his master’s from Georgetown University.

Lynn Dierking

Lynn D. Dierking is Professor, Free-Choice STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics) Learning, College of Science, and Associate Dean for Research, College of Education, Oregon State University. She is internationally recognized for her research on lifelong learning, particularly free-choice, out-of-school time learning (in after-school, home-, and community-based contexts), with diverse youth and families. Recently completed projects include two NSF-funded studies: Cascading Influences, long-term impacts of girls-only informal STEM programs; and, Pathways to Brighter Futures, with incarcerated Hispanic youth. Current research includes NSF-funded projects at Denver Museum of Nature & Science, focused on youth and family STEM literacy, and two projects at Oregon Museum of Science & Industry: REVEAL, investigating family mathematical discourse at math-related exhibits and Designing Our World (DOW), studying girls’ identities in relationship to engineering. She is also co-investigator on the Noyce-funded SYNERGIES project, studying youths’ STEM, creativity and invention interest trajectories in an under-resourced community in Portland and a connected effort, the Lemelson-funded Advancing STEM, Creativity, and Invention Learning through SYNERGIES project. Lynn publishes extensively and is on three editorial boards. Her awards include the 2010 American Association of Museums’ John Cotton Dana Award for Leadership and being an invited speaker in NSF’s 2013 Distinguished Lecture Series.

Heidi Ham

Heidi Ham recently joined NAA as Vice President of Programs and Strategy. She works to advance current work and to create and support new opportunities specifically focused on quality improvement, advancing professionalism, and strengthening state and local alliances. In 1996, Heidi started as a site director with Champions before- and after-school programs in Portland, Oregon, and later became a multisite manager of twelve . Since then, Heidi has served in various roles with the Knowledge Universe (KU) Education Department, working with sites across the nation and facilitating training for a variety of program types including science and academic intervention, coaching for continuous improvement, and developing tools and resources. Heidi is a Council on Accreditation endorser, a Weikart Center for Youth Program Quality Work Methods and Program Management Series trainer, and a National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) conference proposal reviewer. Heidi holds a bachelor of arts in social science and education from Central Washington University. She currently lives in the D.C. metro area with her husband, who also works in the afterschool field.

Dr. Gil Noam

Gil Noam, Ed. D., is the founder and director of the program in Education, Afterschool & Resiliency (PEAR) at Harvard University. An Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School and McLean Hospital focusing on prevention and resilience, Dr. Noam trained as a clinical and developmental psychologist and psychoanalyst in both Europe and the United States. Dr. Noam has a strong interest in translating research and innovation to support resilience in youth in educational settings. He served as the Drector of the Risk and Prevention program at Harvard, and is the founder of the RALLY Prevention Program, an intervention that combines early detection of health, mental health and learning problems in middle school youth, and pioneers a new professional role – “prevention practitioner”. Dr, Noam has published over 200 papers, articles, and books on topics related to child and adolescent development, and risk and resiliency. He is the editor-in-chief of the award-winning journal New Directions in Youth Development: Theory, Practice and Research and onsulsts nationally and internationally to youth development, education and child mental health organizations, foundations and agencies.

Diane Smith

A life-long teacher, Diane Smith began her career as a play-ground monitor in fourth grade. Her 30-plus years of public school experience spans instruction at the elementary, middle, high school and college levels. An expert in the fields of curriculum and instruction, she shared her talents as a teacher, alternative school principal and Director of Curriculum for a large Oregon school district. She is the author of several reflective and research documents on proficiency, as well as It’s About Time, A Framework for Proficiency-based Teaching & Learning. Diane delivers college courses on such topics as administrator leadership, grading for learning in a standards-based classroom and student-centered practices. She is a passionate advocate for proficiency/competency-based education, presenting at national conferences such as Achieve, iNACOL, National Association of Secondary School Principals and ASCD.

Maryann Stimmer

Maryann Stimmer supports STEM education nationally through professional development and project and curriculum design. She is the architect of the Frontiers in Urban Science Education model used in sixteen states and the senior technical adviser on two National Science Foundation projects. Ms. Stimmer served as the chairperson of the Math Special Interest Group (SIG) at the Association for Science and Technology Centers (ASTC) and founded the STEM SIG at the National Afterschool Association. She also served on the US Department of Education’s STEM Technical Working Group and the National Science Teacher Association’s Committees on Informal Science Education and Science Education for Students with Disabilities. Ms. Stimmer is the recipient of the 2008 National Science Teachers Association’s Distinguished Informal Educator Award, the 2009 After School Experience Excellence Award and the New York City Reliance Award for Education. She has been named one of the National Afterschool Association’s 25 Most Influential People in STEM.

 

STEM Institute Keynote

STEMInstitute

Dr Yong ZhaoBio

Yong Zhao currently serves as the Presidential Chair and Director of the Institute for Global and Online Education in the College of Education, University of Oregon, where he is also a Professor in the Department of Educational Measurement, Policy, and Leadership. He is also a professorial fellow at the Mitchell Institute for Health and Education Policy, Victoria University in Australia. His works focus on the implications of globalization and technology on education. He has published over 100 articles and 20 books, including Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Dragon: Why China has the Best (and Worst) Education System in the World, Catching Up or Leading the Way: American Education in the Age of Globalization and World Class Learners: Educating Creative and Entrepreneurial Students.

He is a recipient of the Early Career Award from the American Educational Research Association and was named one of the 2012 10 most influential people in educational technology by the Tech & Learn Magazine. He is an elected fellow of the International Academy for Education. His latest book World Class Learners has won several awards including the Society of Professors of Education Book Award (2013), Association of Education Publishers’ (AEP) Judges’ Award and Distinguished Achievement Award in Education Leadership(2013).Until December, 2010, Yong Zhao was University Distinguished Professor at the College of Education, Michigan State University, where he also served as the founding director of the Center for Teaching and Technology, executive director of the Confucius Institute, as well as the US-China Center for Research on Educational Excellence.

Zhao was born in China’s Sichuan Province. He received his B.A. in English Language Education from Sichuan Institute of Foreign Languages in Chongqing, China in 1986. After teaching English in China for six years, he came to Linfield College as a visiting scholar in 1992. He then began his graduate studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1993. He received his A.M. in Education in 1994 and Ph.D. in 1996. He joined the faculty at MSU in 1996 after working as the Language Center Coordinator at Willamette University and a language specialist at Hamilton College.